The Marriage of areas of knowledge in one building: Chichen-Itza.

When creating resources for teaching Spanish as a foreign language, as an IB educator, I have tried to expose students to perspectives that can cause them to use Spanish to speak or write about their convictions, to find responses for question what they might have and to contribute with their peers in the co-construction of novel ideas.

Many of the videos that I have been making recently, as support resources in my classes, are simple attempts to respond to the questions students bring into the classroom, as they will clearly serve as a platform for future sessions. Needless to say, although my classes are meticulously planned, I enjoy flowing with the thoughts and ideas students provoke in each session, for it is like this how I bring our collaboration add relevance to our experiences.

In this video (which is in Spanish), I try to explain how the Mayans utilized their knowledge in various fields when designing the structure of Chichen-Itza, especially the Temple of Kukulkán. The objective of the video is to serve as a resource to for teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language, while establishing connections with Theory of Knowledge (TOK). Students will be able to work on the following claims:
– To what extents do areas of knowledge contribute to the co-construction of knowledge?
– To what extent are scientific studies a response to religious beliefs and faith queries?
– How is knowledge of ancient cultures and civilisations relevant to us in the present?

Other similar videos (all in Spanish):

History through the use of color

Maps: more than roads

The marriage of art and technology

 

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About Rafael Angel

Curriculum Coordinator and Language Teacher; lives for traveling, reading, learning and tasting new flavours; culture and art lover; passionate about cinema and music. IB MYP, DP Workshop Leader. Mexican YouTuber and Soundclouder.
Video | This entry was posted in ATL, e-learning, IB DP, Inquiry, Resources, TOK and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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